Maternity Leave & Development: New Policy Brief

 

As a follow-up to our recent World Development article on the development benefits of maternity leave, Katy Fallon, Alissa Mazar and myself were asked to contribute a short policy brief based on the research for the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Development Section‘s Sociological Insights for Development Policy series.

The brief has been published and circulated to section members, but is not yet available on the section website, so I am making it available here:

Download (PDF, 177KB)

Aid, Norms, & World Society Workshop

On May 15 & 16, the Katë Hamburger Kolleg Centre for Global Cooperation is hosting a workshop I have organized on foreign aid, norms, and the World Society.

Bringing together sociologists, political scientists, economists, and other development scholars studying foreign aid from an institutionalist perspective, the workshop is intended to be a starting point for discussion of how to better understand aid through a World Society lens (the focus of my Developing Conformity research project).

Many thanks to the Katë Hamburger Kolleg Centre for Global Cooperation and their events team for generously supporting this event.

For more information about the workshop, check out the preliminary schedule below:

Download (PDF, 84KB)

The Development Benefits of Maternity Leave

Maternity leave policies have been adopted in a majority of countries globally, including most low- and middle-income countries. Written with Kathleen M. Fallon (Stony Brook University) and Alissa Mazar (McGill University), my latest article examines the effects of maternity leave on development in these countries. We look specifically at maternity leave’s influence on fertility and infant/child mortality rates. Our findings show that maternity leaves can lead to improved infant/child mortality and fertility rates, but that these effects are moderated by the national income and education levels in a country.

“The Development Benefits of Maternity Leave” is available now in World Development, or a preprint version can be read at SocArxiv.

See the World Development site here: